Surprised by the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek

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As an avid hiker, I was surprised by the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek in Nepal.  I envisioned dirt trails with scenic mountain vistas in all directions.  I expected pathways surrounded by goats and sheep but not many people.  I thought I’d sleep on thin mats on teahouse floors and pantomime conversations with locals who didn’t speak English.  I expected sore legs from climbing serious mountains.

I was completely wrong…except for the sore legs part.  

There are some serious uphill climbs.

The Poon Hill Trek from Pokhara

This is Nepal’s most popular route and a classic Himalaya trek.

Compared to hiking to Everest Base Camp or the Annapurna Circuit, this short trek makes sense for anyone without the time or physical stamina for a more intense endeavor.  It takes 4 or 5 days to hike to the summit of Poon Hill, so it fits well in a two-week Nepal itinerary.  It’s easy to reach from Pokhara and just a quick flight away from Kathmandu.

The Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek is also popular since prices are low, permits are easy to obtain, and packing is simple.

stone staircase along ghorepani poon hill trek in nepal
A beautiful morning along the trail.

Why You Should Include This Trek in Your Nepal Travel Plans

First, let’s talk about why you should trek in general.  A huge part of Nepali life is based on the Himalayas.  Locals don’t just gaze at the mountains from the distance; they actually live in small communities dotted up and down the mountainside.

Trekking in Nepal is about more than nature or scenery: it’s also the only way you’ll get up close to this part of their local culture.  To some extent, you can observe daily life as villagers walk the same paths and climb the same stairs. 

If you can, take an extra day at a homestay along the route — we had a local family who let us help gather eggs and cook a meal.  If you have a porter or guide, they can help translate but any type of exchange is lovely.

host family on the scenery on the ghorepani poon hill trek
A host family on the last night of my trek.

Being able to do this without spending 8 or 10 days climbing to Annapurna Base Camp (“ABC” trek) or even longer to Everest is invaluable.

The Route and Ghorepani Poon Hill Map

Starting from Pokhara, we met up with the staff of 3 Sisters Adventure Trekking, the first company in Nepal to focus on employing women to act as guides and porters.

They explained our route: From Pokhara, we’d drive to Nayapul and then hike a circuit from there up to Ghorepani and back down via Ghandruk before driving back from Nayapul to Pokhara.

ghorepani poon hill trek map (poon hill map)
Route Guide and Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Map

Day 1: Shuttle from Pokhara to the start of the trail and hike from Nayapul to Hille (about 3.5 hours)

Day 2: Hike from Hille to Ghorepani (about 7 hours)

Day 3: Sunrise hike from Ghorepani to the Poon Hill summit (about 1.5 hours) and then continue onward from Ghorepani to Ghandruk (about 9 hours).  This is a LONG day, so the Poon Hill Trek 5 days version splits it in half.

Day 4 (or 5): Hike from Ghandruk to Nayapul (about 4.5 hours)

Parts of the trek is nature trails, heading through rhododendron forests with rainforest-like foliage all around you.  Other parts are stone staircases (4,080 in a row, at one point) that head from village to village and are used by locals as well as visitors.

What is the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek like?

The walk itself is pleasant and follows part of the old Trans-Himalayan Salt Trade Route.  Views change from farms to terraced rice fields, waterfalls, gorges, and forests.  We had a few good mountain views along the way, though the clouds unfortunately obscured them most of the time.

Bridge at the start of the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek
Bridge at the start of the trail

Most groups wake up early every day.  Your hike on the Ghorepani PoonHill trek is very rarely on flat ground: you’ll alternate between uphill trails or going up and down stairs built into the mountainside.  Groups stop for tea when needed, giving your legs a break.  You can order a hot lunch to warm up if you’re there on a windy, rainy, or snowy day.

Once you arrive at your guest house for the night, you slip into a pleasant rhythm of playing cards, reading books, and drinking tea.  Chances are, you’ll recognize other trekkers from along the route and make new friends.

The Downside to Poon Hill Trekking

Perhaps because it’s so accessible, the mountain trail can be congested during high season when up to 300 new trekkers start every day.  Some villages feel like tourist centers with restaurants, souvenir stands, and wi-fi instead of the simple local life I expected to pass.  

Shame on me for not doing my research.

That doesn’t mean you should skip the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek in Nepal.  I enjoyed myself, but it’s important to set expectations in advance.

Should You Complete the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek in 4 or 5 Days?

As a young, fit hiker, I thought four days was perfect. Guides split the route into manageable chunks and explain trail highlights along the way.  Any longer, and I think I would have gone stir crazy with too much time at the tea houses (as it was, my travel companion and I beat the average trek time on a consistent basis).

However, if you’re not acclimated to the altitude or if you have any physical limitations, doing the circuit trek in 5 days is a smarter bet.

>>>>> I highly recommend learning more about acclimating to altitude.  This guide to acclimating was written after a trip to Machu Picchu and Cusco (roughly the same altitude as Poon Hill), but is very relevant to this trek as well.

trail on the scenery on the ghorepani poon hill trek
Scenery along the trail

farms along the scenery on the ghorepani poon hill trek

Costs on the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek

Package trips from Pokhara typically cost in the range of $350 per person, which includes your transport to/from the trailhead, overnight accomodations, meals, a guide, and permits. Costs will vary depending on the season, quality of accomodation you choose, your group size, and whether you go 3 or 4 nights.

If you prefer to arrange everything yourself, you can find lower costs. You can find basic, shared rooms for as low as 400 rupees per night ($4) with hot showers typically available for 100-150 rupees. Meals range from 300-1000 rupees, depending on what you eat and where you are. Expect to pay the lower prices for dal bhat (lentils and rice) and higher prices if you add meat or order a western meal. Costs naturally get more expensive as you’re higher on the mountain.

As I mentioned, we hired a guide and porter. Although you can navigate without a guide, I recommend hiring someone. They know the trails inside and out, have a great grip on when the weather may change, and can call ahead to guesthouses to arrange rooms so you have your first choice of options. Costs vary, depending on their experience and level of English fluency. Since you’re with them for 4 days straight, it’s worth paying for someone you like!

My porter and I along the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek
My porter and I along the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek

Budget about 3000-4000 rupees per day for a guide ($30-40) and 1500-2000 rupees for a porter ($15-20). I enjoyed being able to ask questions about the villages, customs, altitudes, and more so paying for an English-speaking porter was a must for me as well.  Help the local economy out and enjoy a Nepali’s perspective and conversation along the way.

Trekking permits are required and are an additional cost.

Sunrise from Poon Hill

The absolute highlight of the journey is the side trip to Poon Hill.  Here, at 10,230 feet in elevation, you’re provided with 360-degree views of the surrounding snow capped mountains.

You’ll see Annapurna (26,545 feet), Annapurna South, Gangapurna, and Macchupucchare (better known as Fish Tail).  The views are impressive enough to justify a 4:30am wake-up call and strenuous climb.

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Nepal-1-04
The Poon Hill trek maxes out at 3210 meters (10,531 feet)
Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Nepal-2-01
Sunrise on Poon Hill

The Ghorepani Poon Hill trek was not at all what I expected it to be, but I’m still glad I did it.

What to Pack on the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek

You need less than you think.  Most guide shops and/or hotels in Pokhara will let you store the majority of your luggage there while you’re trekking.

The non-negotiables:

Upgrade your sneakers to waterproof hiking shoes and break them in ahead of time.  Wear high-quality Smartwool socks, which keep you from sweating (and therefore help avoid blisters).  Hint: you might want something to slip into at teahouses, like flip flops.

Layers are key and I like Underarmour Cold Gear with a warm sweater.  Learn more about layering in my guide for winter packing.

Some people swear by trekking poles.  I didn’t use them but these lightweight ones work well for traveling.

I should have brought a sleeping bag liner, especially since I already had one at home.

Don’t skimp on sunscreen.  You burn faster at high altitudes.

becky on bridge to ghorepani poon hill in nepal

Logistics for Pokhara Travel

How to Get to Pokhara

From Kathmandu to Pokhara is a 7-hour bus ride, maybe a little shorter if you find a tourist bus with fewer stops.  But the best option is to fly Yeti Airlines (sit on the right side heading toward Pokhara for mountain views).

Where to Stay in Pokhara

I spent one night at the 3 Sisters Lodge before my trek, which was average at best.  However, after my trek I stayed at Butterfly Lodge which I absolutely loved.  Clean, comfortable rooms in a quiet setting just a block away from restaurants and shops.

Best Tours in Pokhara

You should really spend another day or two in Pokhara, especially if you haven’t acclimated to the altitude before your trek.  I really enjoyed my visit to a Tibetan community and wished I had seen sunrise at Sarangkot.

After your trek, choose one of the many spas in town for a therapeutic massage!

Plan the Rest of Your Nepal Trip

80 thoughts on “Surprised by the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek”

  1. Thanks for the report, Becky. Do you have recommendations for any alternate 4-5 day treks in Nepal that might be less touristy?

    1. @Jettyboy, I don’t have any firsthand experience, but I think the treks out of Kathmandu and/or Lukla tend to get less visitors than the ones from Pokhara. If you talked to any guiding company about avoiding crowds, I’m sure they’d have more specific recommendations.

  2. Wow! Great photos, and your commentary brings it to life (my legs get tired just thinking about it). I am so happy for you doing this kind of trek while your still in your “youth.” …yes, that’s what I call it.

    1. @Ed, I’m glad I did it also but there were plenty of “non-youth” completing the trek as well. The best part about it is there are villages scattered the whole way to stop for tea or to spend the night so everyone can go at their own pace. It’s never too late!

  3. Hi there!
    Thank you so much for the great write-up – this has some of the most useful information out there about this trek!

    It’s particularly difficult to find information about hiking times – so this is great context. We were wondering if we could get up to Ghorepani in one day and it sounds like from above that’s not a completely nutty idea. (Yay!)

    We’re generally thinking about doing slightly longer hikes than recommended so that we can cover more ground. Our biggest concern is really about sunlight. Do guesthouses serve breakfast beginning at any time (meaning would we have a warm breakfast if we woke up at sunrise every day)? How long before sunset did it start to get cold?

    The other big question that there’s loads of conflicting advice on is whether or not to bring sleeping bags. We’re planning on bringing liners, and asking for blankets at the tea houses – and it sounds like from what you’ve written that that is possible. I wonder why so many people insist that sleeping bags are necessary? Is it just that people don’t like using not perfectly clean blankets, or are those blankets (+ some extra clothes) inadequate at night?

    Ooh one more question! I’ve seen some pictures of double beds in some teahouses – do you know if many offer that? (That would help with warmth too!) Alternately, are the single beds possible moveable such that we could push them together if need be?

    Thanks so much for sharing your story!!

    1. @Corey, You could definitely get to Ghorepani in one day IF you leave Pokhara at sunrise and IF you are a strong, fit hiker. However, I wouldn’t attempt it unless you’re already acclimated to the altitude (i.e. if you’ve spent a few days in Kathmandu or if you live somewhere like Denver).

      I don’t know exactly how early breakfast is available…definitely at 6am, perhaps earlier. If you’re really concerned, pack some protein bars or snacks and eat when you get started and then break at a different teahouse along the trail around 7-8am for a warm meal. It’ll be more expensive this way (guesthouses give discounts on combined room & board), but it’ll give you more options on timing.

      Temperatures will vary…it snowed on my last day and other days it was chilly all day long due to the elevation. I was very comfortable while hiking, and sometimes really cold when I was just sitting around in the evening. Definitely pack some layers!

      I did not bring a sleeping bag and will admit the blankets are not particularly clean. If you have a liner, that’ll help. The reason people bring sleeping bags is because sometimes the single blanket is not warm enough and sometimes a guesthouse won’t have enough blankets to supply two (if it’s high season). I did *not* bring a sleeping bag…some tips worked wonders at somehow finding an extra blanket. It was worth the cost IMO to not carry a sleeping bag.

      I have no idea how many teahouses have double beds. If that’s important to you, I’d contact a guide service in advance and tell them what you want. They’ll know which teahouses specifically offer that and which don’t. However, rooms are usually “first come, first serve” so even if they have a room or two set up for that, you might not get it if other groups get there first.

    1. @Andy, That was the all-inclusive price as of October 2014. I personally wanted to buy them meals on top of that so that they could eat with us in the restaurants/teahouses but that was voluntary.

    1. @Mimi, There are dozens of trekking companies with stores/offices set up in both Kathmandu and Pokhara to help arrange things. We pre-arranged ours online with 3 Sisters Trekking so that we could do research ahead of time on which company to go with. Have a great trip!

  4. Hey Becky, my wife and I are both in our 50’s and are planning in November spending 10 days in and around Pokhera doing the PoonHill trek then just chilling out for 5 ish days. My question is did you carry your backpack and if yes what is a good size. Love your pics and we cannot wait till November

    1. @Rowley, I relied solely on guesthouse blankets & meals, so didn’t have any bulky camping equipment or food. My day bag included a raincoat, bottled water, camera, and a few miscellaneous items. I shared a porter with my group and she carried our first aid kit, my long underwear layers, flip flops to change into at the guesthouse, and maybe something else I can’t remember now. I didn’t necessarily need a porter but I enjoyed her company and it was only a small expense that also helps the local economy.

      1. I am 62 and just finished this trek on May8, 2016. I agree with Becky that it was not what we expected and totally not easy but very enjoyable. Our tour was provided by nepaltrekkingtourisim.com and I would highly recommend. They do this trek the opposite of most as they believe it’s a little easier climbing the steps to Ghandruk and come down from Poon Hill. After completing the trek, I would agree. Also you are going against most other treks and we had less tourists at each overnight stop. Sleeping bags can be rented in Pokhara so one thing less to bring from home. Your pictures of the stone steps can be helpful for those planning to trek in Nepal. Don’t just practice on flat or hilly terrain. You better find some steps to go up and down because there are many all over these mountains. Nearly anyone can do this trek but some preparation will make the legs less sore.

      2. @Brad, Thanks for chiming in with your experience! Sounds like a great idea to do the trek in opposite order and glad you had a good time.

  5. Hey Becky!

    Thank you for that descriptive and informative bit about the Poon Hill Trek. Me and my friends are planning a holiday to Nepal and planning to do this trek. But I was wondering if the Poon Hill trek can be done in 3 days (Up and down)? Because we are there for only 7 days and we have planned other things to do as well as this trek which seems to be the shortest and best option. Any info on this subject will be appreciated. Thanks!

    1. @Gautam, If you are already in Pokhara so you can get an early start on Day 1, it should be possible. However, I would worry a little about acclimatizing to the altitude in that quick of a journey. The elevation is the hard part, it is not like hiking at sea level!

  6. hii, I will be travelling to Nepal from 8th oct. to 12th with a group of four other Indian women (with moderate fitness level). I actually wanted to know if it is feasible to reach kathmandu, stay there for night, start for pokhara next morning for poon hill trek, finish it in 2nights and 3days (incl. travel time from KTM to pokhara) and stay and relax in pokhara the last night. Also, do i need advanced booking for trek guides and stay options during the trek. Can you suggest any suitable for a group of women?

    Also, if this seems unfeasible, can you suggest other popular trek options doable in 2days?

    Your help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.

    1. @Shilpa, Doing it all in 3 days is pushing it, but it’s possible if you are already adjusted to the altitude. For starters, you’d absolutely need to fly from Kathmandu to Pokhara and have a guide arranged in advance to assist with permits and paperwork preparations. I’d be very careful about the elevation and oxygen levels if you haven’t acclimated. I recommend 3 Sisters Trekking.

  7. Hi Becky, thank you for your blog information. I plan to do poon hill next March on my own. Climbing hills/mountains hasn’t been an issue with me generally, however, going back down always was worse. How is the descent? Also, would you consider a single female safe on the trail? Thank you in advance.

    1. @Alice, Since most of the trail includes stairs, you’ll need to evaluate whether that’s hard on your joints and muscles. I don’t recall any super steep portions on an incline trail rather than stairs. If you are a solo female with a guide or porter, 100% safe. If you truly mean traveling solo, I’d say 90% safe. There are a lot of other people on the trail to assist if you have trouble or injuries, but if you somehow got off the trail, I’d be a bit concerned. See if you can tag onto a group. It doesn’t need to be the same group for the whole duration, just pop down the trail and stick close by to other people.

  8. I was just curious on when you climb down from the top are there any major issues. Like, major areas with loose rocks. That’s the only problem I usually run across on steep descents going back down mountains.

    So, the 10% non-safety category would be person on person crimes like being attacked? I’m assuming? Or were you referring to non-safety like illness and injuries? Just trying to clarify. Thanks again Becky. Just trying to prepare before I go, and yes, I will most likely hike alone.

    I think we all imagine how a hike might be, and when we get there it’s probably nothing. Or, it could be something extensive. Extensive to me is crawling and climbing over rocks and boulders, so is it like that?

    1. @Alice, Don’t think of it as a hike. These trails originally started as paths for local people to walk from village to village. They are stairs in steep sections and dirt paths in gentler slopes, often wide enough for a donkey cart. There are a few short sections that are more like a wooded trail, but I don’t recall them being terribly difficult.

      I haven’t heard of any crimes, but it’s always a possibility. I think a bigger issue would be if you accidentally roll your ankle or end up with altitude sickness or dehydration from foodborne illness.

  9. Hi,
    I read dozen of descriptions of this route, and this is the most detailed one, by far.
    So first, thanks !
    And the map is great !

    Now for the questions:
    1) Did you really need waterproof shoes ? I’m planning on my sports shoes 🙁 (End of October)
    2) How long does it take to get the TIMS and stuff like that, which is needed to enter the park ? how much does it cost ?
    If I arrive with flight from KTM, should I get into city – arrange Permits, porter, car etc, and then go hiking ?
    How much time do you think will last from landing till finishing the arrangements and the car will take us to the start point ?

    3) What do you say about the aforementioned suggestion here , to do the route from the opposite direction ?

    4) I have 4 days for this trek, are the predicted 9 hours from Ghorepani to Ghandruk difficult to go, or is it just long ?

    5) If my international flight is 12 at noon, from KTM, would you count on a scheduled flight from Poukhara to KTM on 8:45 the same morning ?

    Thanks !

    1. @Hillel,

      1) Weather is unpredictable, especially at higher altitudes. If you will be comfortable hiking with potentially wet socks/shoes, you can wear whatever works for you. However, I’d take every possible precaution against blisters, athlete’s foot, etc. It’s a long hike back if your feet are sore!
      2) The paperwork can usually be done in a day. If you don’t have time to wait, make reservations before you arrive in Nepal.
      3) I haven’t done the route in reverse order so I can’t comment.
      4) If you are a regular trekker at home and are acclimated to the altitude, you can do the trek from Ghorepani to Ghandruk in one day. I did it…but I had been in Nepal a full week so that elevation was less of a factor.
      5) If your first flight lands on time, you’ll have no trouble making the connection. However it doesn’t leave any time for possible delays. I’d highly encourage travel insurance for that scenario.

  10. Hi Becky! Thanks for the detailed description. I had a couple of quick questions.

    You did not mention anything about bringing altitude sickness pills. I know this trek has some potential for some hikers to get altitude sickness, but do you think I need to bring pills?

    I’m traveling with a group of 7. How big are the teahouses? Will all of my party be able to stay close to each other or will we be separated?

    Thanks!
    Stephanie

    1. @Stephanie, I didn’t take diamox or other altitude sickness pills because I had plenty of time in Kathmandu to acclimate prior to the start of the trek. If you want to bring medicine just in case, talk to your doctor about it. I would NOT recommend getting medicine while already in Nepal unless it’s an emergency (in which case, you definitely shouldn’t be trekking).

      Teahouses range from 2-20 rooms, so you should be able to find places where your whole party can stay together. If that’s an absolute must-have, definitely work with a guide who can call ahead and make arrangements on your behalf. A guide’s cost split 7 ways will be a bargain anyway 🙂

  11. Hi,

    I’m a confident walker, but have a real aversion to aretes. Are there any arete, or narrow ridge sections to this trek?

    Thanks in advance.

  12. I recently visited Ghandruk which had been much easier to hike now. We travelled from Kathmandu to Ghandruk by bus which had a direct route. The bus at Kathmandu (naya bus park) leaves at 7am everyday and will arrive at ghandruk at around 7pm. Then we stayed overnight at Kimche which is the last stop till date. In the early morning we hiked from Kimche to Ghandruk village which took about 40mins to get the view. Unfortunately on the day we reached On the hill, it was bit cloudy but got a glimpse of mount Dhaulagiri and machhepuchare. In my opinion the world have quite changed there were not much snow cover mountain anymore even during the time of winter. When I asked the local since when this transformation began, she answered about 3 years and she thinks that there had been cursed in the mountains but that cursed was man made which we can resolve it. So start early to conserve our home. Jai nepal. Save our planet.

  13. Hey. thanks for the article! Very Informative:) I was just wanting to confirm, This Poon Hill trek connects from Kathmandu to Pokhara? I am looking for a trek that connects the two cities, if there are any.

    1. @Kai, Poon Hill is round-trip from Pokhara, so you will need to make alternate arrangements to the start point (either by flying or driving). For reference, Kathmandu to Pokhara is about 200 kilometers; I don’t know any treks connecting the two cities.

  14. This is a great article! Poon Hill is on my bucket list; hoping to accomplish it within the next couple years. Great info!

  15. Hi!

    Thanks for the great article! I was wondering about a few things:

    1) Did you leave all your stuff you were travelling with (like your luggage) somewhere in Pokhara when you were doing the trail? I’ll be travelling with a single hiking backpack, but it would a massive improvement if I wouldn’t have to take the whole thing along with me!

    2) I’ll be in Pokhara in July, and that is during the rain season. I’ve hear a lot of people say the trek is still very possible to do, but a lot of companies don’t offer tour guides during the rain season. Do you think it is still worth doing the trek in July?

    Thanks so much!

    1. @Guusje, Most Pokhara hotels are happy to hold your luggage for the short trek, especially if you have a reservation both before and after your trek. If you don’t, some will still hold the luggage for a small fee ($1-2/day). Ask around, although the first place I’d ask is where you’re staying. It’s very common!

      I don’t have any personal experience with this trek during the rainy season but I’ve done many others in the rain. It’s all what you make of it, and you’ll need to have a positive attitude and bring good rain gear with you. Jackets are obvious, but footwear is going to be the most essential since wet feet can lead to blisters. The upside is it will probably be less crowded. The downside is that if it is cloudy, you might not have great views along the way.

  16. Hi Becky,

    Thanks for the detailed description. I had few questions.

    1.I am planning to follow the trail solo,is it safe and recommended for not getting lost ?
    2.Will i get Tea Houses on arrival ?
    3.What was your total expenditure for the entire trek ?

    1. @Ajivit Paul,
      1. Yes it’s safe and easy to follow the path independently.
      2. I recommend you reserve tea houses in advance because they do fill up (especially in high season). If you want to wait and get them on arrival, then you will need to start your hikes early in the morning so you arrive before other trekkers.
      3. My trek was about $450, including permits, food, tea houses, taxis, guide, and porter. You can make it cheaper if you do it yourself.

  17. Hi Becky.
    Thank you for your info about this trek.
    My question:
    – i’ll never done trek in my country (italy) but only slowly walking. I don’t know if Will be possible for me this trek.
    – to November will be a trip in Nepal & i’m thinkong abut it..some day to Nepal end Kathmandu so the group will come to trek.
    -waiting this time, how could i train me, to altitude, montain, acclimate my body etc. ?
    – how long time before could i start train?

    Your info are vary precious. Kiss&embrace
    Francesca

    1. @Francesca,
      1) Yes it is possible, but I would choose the 5-day version if you don’t normally trek so that you have an easier time.
      2) I would wait at least 3 days in Nepal before starting the trek to adjust and acclimate.
      3) Start training at home! It is hard to adjust to altitude at home but you can practice exercising and hiking by day.

      1. I would agree with Becky but would add on the training. Climb a lot of stairs or steps. Go to your local football stadium and walk up and down stairs because if you trek in Nepal you will do many up and down climbs on stone steps. The altitude is about like Colorado but we did not know about all the step climbing involved. Get prepared.

      2. Thank you so mach!
        I practice yoga & dance but it’s vary different to trek 🙂
        The trek in the trip will start at the 6th day, so it’s ok to adjust & acclimate.
        Now it’s the time to start traing at home..and why not stairs or steps, like Brad says me.

        My country is Marche, if you are curious to look sea, hill & good food 😛 🙂

        Nice to meet you.
        I’ll write you when i’ll decide to go on.
        F.

  18. Hey Becky, thanks for the article it was full of great information. I will be travelling for 2 weeks around Nepal next year ( end of March 2018 ). My purpose for going there is for landscape photography, questions:

    1) Is there any legs of the trek that you would say I should dedicate more time towards capturing photos?
    2) I plan to get up for every sunrise and stay out for every sunset, is there any little side trips that you would recommend for Sunrise/Sunsets?
    3) If I had hired a Porter, do they go at whatever speed I choose? Would it be a problem if they had to keep stopping along the trail so that I could setup my tripod/camera etc, and take photos? Or would they be hurrying me along to get to the resting place for that day? I’m just trying to decide if I should do this trek on my own or hire a porter…..my camera gear definitely would add some weight to the trip, and I don’t have a problem helping out the local economy.

    Thanks!
    Brodie

    1. @Brodie,
      1) Photography will be weather-dependent for the most part. In the mountains, the weather changes often and is unpredictable so it’s hard to know in advance what you may or may not be able to capture. That said, I’d plan on a 5-day version instead of 4 if you expect to add on side trips and lots of stops.
      2) I don’t recall any particularly amazing sunrise/sunset moments on my trek but that may have just been the weather (or the fact that I was only up for sunrise 1 out of 4 days). A local guide will absolutely know where to go if you make your desires clear.
      3) Porters go at any speed you choose. If you expect to be MUCH slower than the average traveler, tell them in advance to arrange a fair payment. Remember, even a 50% surcharge on a $20/day porter will be a small expense for most western travelers.

  19. Hi Becky,
    I did the Annapuna Base Camp trek in late May 1994 when almost everyday from late morning onwards it was raining and cloudy so I could not see the mountains most of the time. I notice you have similar experience from your blog. When did you travel? I am likely to do the shorter Poon Hill this time thinking of going in early April next year. Do you think this is a cloudy month there?

    Best regards
    CK

    1. @Ck, I went in late October, so I don’t have any personal experience with spring weather. In theory, rainfall is about equal in both seasons but I can’t confirm!

  20. Hello
    We are interested in the poon hill trek but we are planning to holiday in July which is monsoon season. Do you have any advice about going in monsoon season.?
    Thankyou
    Thea

    1. @Thea, I haven’t personally done it, but here’s what I would recommend:
      1) Do the 5-day version instead of 4. For one thing, that builds in time for you to stop for a cup of tea if it is pouring rain.
      2) Pack the right gear – I have some recommendations at “How to Hike in the Rain

  21. Hi Becky!! This is first time on your travel blog. Really impressed with your posts and specially writing style, simple effective and useful with too many links. I have been to Nepal too many times including Pokhara. All the time only party kind of trip, this time traveling with my six years old son and want to make great experience for him including Ghorepani and Poon hill trek in our plan. My only question is where I can get a porter without going through all those expensive travel agencies? Please provide with some idea on that. Thanks in advance.

    1. @Maha, If you hire a porter in Pokhara, it will be cheaper than if you look online. Don’t ask the hotel or agency for help (they will take a commission) – you will need to negotiate directly for the cheapest price. For me, it was worth the extra few dollars a day to have it all arranged in advance so I could start hiking immediately instead of spending a day in town preparing.

      1. Thanks for the fast response. Really appreciated. Where I can find cheap porter for my 7 days trek with my six years old son?

    1. @Kent, I expected a nature trail (dirt path through the woods, etc) used primarily by hikers and this was 70% stone staircases with a lot of local, Nepali traffic heading from village to village. This isn’t a bad thing — just a very different reality than what I had visualized.

  22. Hi Becky, this trip sounds amazing! I am thinking of booking the same trip through the 3 sisters for this coming January. However I will be a solo trekker (19 yr female) do you think it would be safe for me to attempt this on my own?
    Thanks

    1. @Olivia, If you are booking this with a guide (3 Sisters or similar), no problem! If you want to go 100% solo & independent, I would be a little hesitant just because it’s good to have someone keeping an eye out for you in case of injuries along the trail or anything along those lines.

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