Take Your Local Library With You on Vacation

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Last week, Tiff on Heels First Travel shared a photo of library travel guides that looked surprisingly like my living room when I’m in the midst of choosing a destination.  However, more often than not, the library is a part of my travel routine for another reason…in preparation for packing.

I never used to take library books with me on vacation, for fear of losing them, spilling coffee on them, being late to return them, or simply wanting to leave them behind rather than carrying them after I finish reading them.  Instead, I’d stop by garage sales, used book sales, and book exchanges for 50-cent paperbacks that I treated as disposables.  I’ve left little reading gifts all over the globe on guesthouse bookshelves and in airport terminals.

But lately?  I haven’t spent a dime on books.  These days, the library hooks me up in two different ways:

e-Books: For bibliophiles, there is no better gadget to own than a Kindle.  However, e-Books can be expensive compared to my used paperback habits, and so I depend on the library.  My local library – and many others – offers a sizeable selection of books that you can borrow on your e-reader of choice, and I don’t even have to step foot in the actual building to borrow them.  I can download books last-minute at 4am before heading to the airport for that early morning flight and 95% of the time all I need is a wireless internet connection and an internet browser (some select titles require a USB connection).

Pays for itself when you don't shop at airport bookstores.
Pays for itself when you don’t shop at airport bookstores.

Having a dozen books pre-loaded to my Kindle means I have plenty of entertainment for waiting at the airport, on the plane, on the beach, and before bed.  I can return them with the click of a button from my room in Slovenia so that others can read them or they’ll simply disappear at the end of my pre-determined lending period in case I forget to manually return them.  Amazingly, if I ever borrow (or buy) those books again, all my annotations and bookmarks will remain in tact.  On the off-chance I need more books before returning home, I can just return online to borrow more books and have them delivered over any wi-fi connection worldwide.

It’s entirely simple, essentially weightless, and 100% free.

TIP: Try this at home first to make sure you’ve got the hang of it.  For example, my library requires that choosing books must be done via internet browser and not the Kindle store on my actual e-reader.  Not a big deal, but it means I want my laptop/iPad handy.

Audiobooks: If you roadtrip as much as I do, audiobooks can be a lifesaver.  They are great company for when you’re driving solo and great fillers for when you’ve got 16 hours of driving on the agenda for the weekend even if you’re traveling with someone else.  Additionally, audiobooks can be just as useful when you’re flying and your eyes dry out before you’re ready to stop reading.  Yes, podcasts are useful for this as well, but if you’ve got a 20-hour journey on your docket, you’re probably looking for something a bit longer than 30 minutes…

Audiobooks can be borrowed for free (digitally!) from many local libraries and make great entertainment on roadtrips, long flights, and even on the beach. Learn more at https://sightdoing.net/free-books-at-library/ #travel #reading

While my library offers audiobooks as downloadable loans, it’s not quite as simple as borrowing an e-Book.  I absolutely have to borrow and return audiobooks from my computer, as it requires a special software.  After download, I have no issues transferring to iPod, iPad, or otherwise.  If I’m traveling without my laptop, I have to get everything prepped ahead of time.  Your library may or may not have similar requirements.

TIP: The Hunger Games trilogy is better by audiobook than physical book (or movie, for that matter) and can be good for the entire family on a roadtrip.  Anthony Bourdain’s books are incredibly great on audio, but definitely not for kids.

A little bit of time at home while you’re packing up for your trip will help you save on books for your journey, giving you more money to spend on entertainment once you arrive at your destination.  Besides, I bet your library’s selection is better than any airport bookstore, anyway…

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7 thoughts on “Take Your Local Library With You on Vacation”

  1. Iolaire McFadden

    We have no issues taking guide books from the library on our trips. If you damage the book you could always buy a replacement. But honestly these days we don’t want the weight of book, so we read them, maybe take a photocopy of a few key pages and take those with us.

    Good advice on eBooks.

  2. I love my Kindle! I also borrow a lot of ebooks through my local library, and you’re right about how easy it is for traveling (I always worried about returning books late). I read quickly, so it also provides a huge weight savings for me over a bunch if physical books. I always have novels on my Kindle PW, and sometimes travel guides on my iPad in the Kindle app, since I find the color screen and ease of flipping back and forth better on the iPad, but prefer reading on the Kindle for longer stretches of time.

  3. Your recommendations are spot on! I discovered the miracle of borrowing e books before out trip last year. Bonus: if you have Amazon Prime, you get to borrow 1 free kindle book per month from a select list!
    Audiobooks are great for daily commuters too!

  4. @Iolaire, I tend to abuse my guidebooks, with folded down pages, highlights, notes, and sometimes ripped out pages if it makes more sense to carry 2-3 pages rather than a book.

    @Leigh, thanks for the tip on using your iPad for guidebooks. I’ve found they don’t always format properly on my Kindle, so I’ll try it a new way next time.

    @Eva, Great reminder about Amazon Prime! I don’t currently have it, but I bet a lot of other people could be taking advantage of that.

  5. If you borrow EBooks from the library. If you haven’t finished reading the book yet and its time for it to return. Just turn off the WIFI on the Ereader. It can’t automatically go back if you don’t have internet.

  6. If your library has an agreement with zinio you can download free issues of up to 110 magazines with no due date. It is a great weight saver. You can download to a pc or a phone or a tablet.

  7. Pingback: Why the Amazon Kindle is the Best Travel Gadget I Ever Bought - The Girl and Globe

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